7 Tips for Managing Diabetes

Family Features  |  2017-12-12

(Family Features) Staying healthy can be a challenge, especially for those living with diabetes. Everyone can have conflicts finding the right balance of partaking in healthy habits, such as exercise, eating well and even keeping your teeth and gums clean. From stress to self-care, life can be up and down when you’re living with diabetes.

These seven tips from Dr. Natalie Strand, the winner of season 17 of “The Amazing Race” who lives with diabetes herself, can help you stay healthy and lead a balanced life while managing your diabetes.

Communicate with your care team. Make sure you connect with your nurse educator, endocrinologist and dietician. Reach out to them with your questions as they can often help you implement subtle changes to avoid completely overhauling your lifestyle and routine because of diabetes.

Get involved. Get a local group together to fundraise, vent or just understand each other. Groups such as Diabetes Sisters, JDRF, TuDiabetes and BeyondType1 offer ways to connect with others living with diabetes in person or on social media. Connecting with the diabetes community can be a powerful way to help ease the burden of living with diabetes. 

Keep doing what you love. Just because you have diabetes doesn’t mean you have to give up doing what you love. Make efforts to continue sports, travel and other hobbies, even if there is a learning curve to adapting with diabetes at first. 

Maintain good oral health. People living with diabetes are two times more likely to develop gum disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Colgate Total toothpaste is FDA-approved to help reverse and prevent gingivitis, an early form of gum disease.

Get into a routine. Find a routine that works and stick with it. This way you don’t have to make new decisions each day. Anything that can ease the mental burden of diabetes can help. For example, pick a time each year for your annual visits: eye doctor, endocrinologist, renew prescriptions, etc. Picking the same time of year every year can help ensure you don’t forget to take care of yourself.

Make self-care a priority. It can be hard to keep diabetes care in the forefront. It can be boring, exhausting and also fade into the background. Remind yourself that one of the best things you can do for yourself, and for your loved ones, is stay healthy. Use your family as motivation to exercise daily, eat better-for-you foods and maintain a healthy weight. 

Manage stress. Diabetes can be a big stressor. Add jobs, kids, relationships and it can become overwhelming. Find an easy and effective tool for stress relief and do it often. Even 5-10 minutes of guided meditation daily can have a big impact on stress management. 

For more information and ways to lead a balanced life with diabetes, visit OralHealthandDiabetes.com.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

3 Ways Pups Can Improve Seniors’ Health

Family Features  |  2017-12-12

Photo courtesy of Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com

(Family Features) Furry friends can play a significant role in pet owners’ lives. The old saying goes, “dogs are man’s best friend,” and research shows they may be more than that. In fact, they just might be the key to keeping seniors active.

According to a study conducted by the University of Lincoln and Glasgow Caledonian University in collaboration with Mars Petcare Waltham Centre for Pet Nutrition, dog owners 65 and older were found to walk over 20 minutes more a day than seniors who did not have canine companions at home.

The study documented three key conclusions:

  1. Dog owners walked further and for longer than non-dog owners.
  2. Dog owners were more likely to reach recommended activity levels.
  3. Dog owners had fewer periods of sitting down.

“Older adult dog owners are more active than those without dogs and are also more likely to meet government recommendations for daily physical activity,” said Nancy Gee, human animal interaction researcher at Waltham. “We are learning more every day about the important roles pets play in our lives, so it’s no surprise that pets are now in more than 84 million households. It’s great to recognize how pets can help improve seniors’ lives.”

Walking with your pup can help both the pet and owner get in shape. Pets can keep older adults active and even help them meet the recommended public health guidelines for weekly physical activity. According to the study, on average, dog owners more often participated in 30 minutes a day of moderate physical activity and achieved 2,760 additional steps.  

However, the benefits of pet ownership go beyond physical activity. It’s no secret that pets provide companionship. From reducing rates of stress, depression and feelings of social isolation, pets can play a significant role in improving people’s lives, which ultimately can make pet owners happier and healthier.

Not only do pets serve as companions in their own right, studies have shown that dog owners can get to know their neighbors through their pets. Pets can even help facilitate the initial meeting and conversation, which may come as no surprise for many dog owners who have chatted with others while walking their dogs. For older adults who live alone or in a group facility, having a pet is also a great way to build relationships with others.

As senior citizens are celebrated on upcoming days that acknowledge older adults, it turns out living with a pet can be a healthy choice for seniors in more ways than one.

For more information on the benefits of pet ownership, visit bettercitiesforpets.com.

Photo courtesy of Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com

...Read More!  
  |  

Tackling Depression Can Lead To A Happier New Year

(NAPS) - Sponsored content  |  2017-12-05

At New Year’s, or anytime, you don’t have to let depression get you down. Talking to a therapist can help. Photo courtesy NAPS.

(NAPS) - As cheerful and joyous as the New Year can be, it can also be a trigger for stress and depression for some people—but there is hope. There are many resources for people who feel wrung out ringing in the New Year.

For example, Marriage and Family Therapists (MFTs) can help. MFTs are licensed mental health professionals who work with individuals, couples (married or not), families of all types, and groups to cure or relieve mental, emotional and relational concerns of all kinds.

How To Recognize Depression

To help you tell if you or someone you care about is suffering from depression, the experts at the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists (CAMFT) offer these warning signs:

• Feeling sad and/or irritable

• Changes in weight or appetite

• Difficulty sleeping

• Feelings of guilt, hopelessness or worthlessness

• Inability to concentrate, remember things or make decisions

• Thoughts of death or suicide.

How To Handle Depression

If these symptoms look familiar, here are some things to do right now:

•   Recognize depression early. Depression can happen to anyone. It’s not a character defect, a weakness or a shameful condition. It’s a serious disorder that no one is immune to.

•   Engage in your life. If you are depressed, you may feel like you don’t have an ounce of energy or motivation to tackle depression. Recovery, however, requires your active participation. Be willing to take the first step, even though it’s not easy.

•   Build your skills. Learn why you’re vulnerable to depression and specific ways to become more resilient by breaking unhealthy patterns of thought and behavior. Developing good coping and relationship skills can reduce both the frequency and severity of depression episodes.

•   Find the right therapist. Talking through one’s stressors and understanding the underlying causes is a proven way to effectively treat depression. Look for therapists with training and experience in treating depression, as well as someone who is warm, supportive and goal oriented. Use short telephone interviews to find a good fit with potential therapists. Ask about how they approach problems like yours.

•   Be optimistic. You have every reason to believe you can get better with effective treatment. While anti-depressants are not a cure, they can be very helpful to some people in managing depression. Whether or not you choose to use medicine to manage your symptoms, therapy can give you the long-term skills you need to live a productive, fulfilling life.

How To Learn More

For further information about how to find a therapist, visit www.CounselingCalifornia.com.

Sponsored content

...Read More!  
  |  

Chapa-De Indian Health to Award 2017 April Moore Memorial Scholarship

Source: Chapa-De Indian Health  |  2017-06-13

Two local members of the community, Lauren DeGruccio, a graduate of Nevada Union High School and Tara Bain-Sorensen, a graduate of Victory Independent in Rocklin, have been selected to each receive a $1,000 scholarship through the April Moore Memorial Scholarship Program.

DeGrucio is a recent 2017 graduate from Nevada Union High School in Grass Valley, CA. She plans to continue her education at San Jose State studying biochemistry with the hopes of pursuing graduate studies in Pharmacology. She is a member of the Navajo Nation and looks forward to using her education to give back to her community.

Bain-Sorensen, a member of the Cherokee Tribe, graduated from Victory Independent in Rocklin, CA and attended Sacramento City College to become a Licensed Vocational Nurse. Bain-Sorensen has been working as a local school Nurse, and was recently accepted into Butte College’s LVN to RN program. She is excited to follow through with the next step of her education to become a Registered Nurse and hopes to give back to the American Indian Community as an RN and Health Educator.

“We are very excited and honored to be able to offer a scholarship that is benefitting two very deserving young women” says Lisa Davies, Chief Executive Office of Chapa-De Indian Health. “This scholarship is fitting because April dedicated her life to help advance American Indian people especially in health and education, and this year, we felt as if these two exemplary women would do the same through their education.”

The April Moore Memorial Scholarship was established in 2016 to honor Chapa-De’s long-time Board President April Moore, who dedicated her life to advancing American Indian people and served on the Chapa-De Board of Directors for 26 years. The scholarship is available to American Indian or Alaska Native students who plan to pursue a career in healthcare and attended a high school in Placer, Nevada, Sacramento or Sierra Counties in California. The applicants must be a graduating high school senior, or a college student with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.

Additional information about Chapa-De and their scholarship opportunities is available online at www.chapa-de.org or by calling 530-887-2800.

Chapa-De Indian Health (Chapa-De) is a 501(c) 3 non-profit organization that was established in 1974 and operates community health clinics in Auburn and Grass Valley, California. Chapa-De offers comprehensive primary medical care, dental and orthodontics, behavioral health counseling, psychiatry, nutrition and health education, women’s health, pharmacy, and optometry services.

...Read More!  
  |  

Widespread Flu Activity that is More Severe than Last Year

California Department of Public Health Special Report  |  2017-01-26

California Department of Public Health (CDPH) State Public Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith reported today that the state is experiencing widespread influenza activity that is more severe than last year. CDPH has also received the first report of a death associated with influenza in a child younger than 18 years of age. The death occurred in Riverside County.

“This is a tragic reminder that the flu is a serious illness for people of all ages and kills thousands of Americans each year,” said Dr. Smith. “If you haven’t been immunized yet this season, getting flu shots for you and your family now can still help protect you this winter.”

CDPH disease monitoring indicates widespread flu activity across the state that is more severe than last year. Since the beginning of the influenza season, CDPH has received reports of 14 influenza-associated deaths, including the child in Riverside. This count represents a fraction of the total flu deaths statewide because only deaths in people younger than 65 are reported to the state and not all influenza-related deaths are easily attributable to influenza.

Hospitals statewide have been impacted by a surge in influenza patients, and hospitalizations for pneumonia and influenza at Kaiser Permanente hospitals in Northern California during the week ending January 7 reached 10.2 percent, the highest level recorded in 10 years. “We are closely monitoring the impact of influenza on health care facilities,” said Dr. Smith. “Some acute care hospitals in California are full and have diverted patients to other facilities.”

For anyone who has not yet received a flu shot this season, it is not too late. Influenza activity usually continues for several months, and it is still early in the season. CDPH recommends all Californians aged six month and older, including pregnant women, should get the annual flu vaccine. The flu virus circulating this season closely matches the vaccine, suggesting that the vaccine will provide protection against influenza and reduce the risk of severe disease.

The flu vaccine prevents disease due to the most serious wintertime virus, but other viruses are also circulating now.

For more information about influenza visit the CDPH influenza web page: www.cdph.ca.gov/HealthInfo/discond/Pages/Influenza(Flu).aspx.

...Read More!  
  |  

Crab Health Advisory Lifted for CA Coast

Source: California Department of Public Health  |  2017-01-13

The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) has lifted the last remaining health advisory for Dungeness crab caught along the California coast. CDPH lifted this advisory on January 11th due to recent tests showing that traces of domoic acid have declined to low or undetectable levels in Dungeness crabs caught in the area, indicating they are safe to consume.

Dungeness crabs caught along the coast are safe to consume. However, as a precaution, consumers are advised not eat the viscera (internal organs, also known as “butter” or “guts”) of crabs. The viscera usually contain much higher levels of domoic acid than crab body meat. When whole crabs are cooked in liquid, domoic acid may leach from the viscera into the cooking liquid. Water or broth used to cook whole crabs should be discarded and not used to prepare dishes such as sauces, broths, soups or stews (for example, cioppino or gumbo), stocks, roux, dressings or dips.

Symptoms of domoic acid poisoning can occur within 30 minutes to 24 hours after eating toxic seafood. In mild cases, symptoms may include vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, headache and dizziness. In severe cases, the victim may experience trouble breathing, confusion, disorientation, cardiovascular instability, seizures, excessive bronchial secretions, permanent loss of short-term memory, coma or death.

Domoic acid accumulation in seafood is a natural occurrence that is related to a “bloom” of a particular single-celled plant. CDPH will continue to monitor conditions to ensure that seafood sold in California is safe to consume.

For more information, visit www.cdph.ca.gov

...Read More!  
  |  

Use Caution When Collecting, Eating Wild Mushrooms

Source: California Department of Public Health  |  2016-12-29

Amanita phalloides. 
--Photo courtesy of Trent Pearce, Tilden Nature Area

With seasonal rains promoting the growth of wild mushrooms, California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Director and State Public Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith is reminding people that collecting and eating hazardous wild mushrooms can lead to serious illness and even death.

“It is difficult to distinguish between wild mushrooms that are poisonous and those which are safe to eat,” said Dr. Smith. “Wild mushrooms should not be eaten unless they have been carefully examined and determined to be edible by a mushroom expert.”

Wild mushroom poisoning continues to make people ill and send them to the hospital. According to the California Poison Control System (CPCS), 679 cases of ingestion were reported statewide from November 2015 to October 2016. Among those cases:

  • Three suffered a major health outcome, such as liver failure leading to coma and/or a liver transplant, or kidney failure requiring dialysis.
  • 50 suffered a moderate health outcome, such as dehydration due to vomiting and diarrhea, or injury to the liver or kidney.
  • 348 were children under six years of age. Usually the children ate a small amount of a mushrooms growing in yards or neighborhood parks.
  • 415 were treated at a health care facility.
  • Eight were admitted to an intensive care unit.

The most serious illnesses and deaths have been linked primarily to wild mushrooms known to cause liver damage, including Amanita phalloides, also known as the “death cap” and Amanita ocreata, or “destroying angel.” These and other poisonous mushrooms grow in some parts of California year-round, but are most commonly found during fall, late winter or spring.

Eating poisonous mushrooms can cause abdominal pain, cramping, vomiting, diarrhea, liver damage or death. Anyone who develops symptoms after eating wild mushrooms should seek immediate medical attention. People who develop these symptoms, or their treating health care providers, should immediately contact Poison Control at 1-800-222-1222.

Local mycological societies offer educational resources about mushroom identification, and may be able to help people identify mushrooms they have picked.

...Read More!  
  |