Loomis Soroptimist Club Education Awards Empower Women

By Karen Fraser-Middleton  |  2019-03-29

K-8 teachers in the Loomis Union School District received grants for Soroptimist International Loomis Basin. Photo courtesy LUSD

LOOMIS, CA (MPG) - Consistent with the mission of Soroptimist International (SI) to “transform the lives and status of women and girls through education, empowerment and enabling opportunities,” the SI Loomis Basin (SILB) club presented grants and awards on February 20 to support  education, especially for women and girls. The club distributed nearly $10,000 in scholarships, teacher grants and support for the Senior L.I.F.E center.

The Ruby Award for Women Helping Women recognized Carol Pepper-Kittredge, Associate Dean, Workforce Innovation, Sierra College for “improving the lives of women through her professional activities.” Through the CCC Maker initiative, she has created an inclusive statewide makerspace model to prepare all students for innovative, entrepreneurial and non-traditional careers. Pepper-Kittredge also previously led the Sierra Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM) Consortium, according to Gregg Ramseth, Technology & Assessment, Placer Union High School District (PUHSD). “Carol and her team were instrumental in pivoting Placer Union's perspective and outreach, helping us design inclusive programs that build confidence in young women as makers, entrepreneurs, problem-solvers and innovators,” said Ramseth. The club provided funds for Hacker Lab powered by Sierra College makerspace scholarships for women.

The SI Live Your Dream Award celebrates women who have overcome poverty, divorce, domestic violence and other life challenges through education. Ashley Volkerts received a $3000 scholarship to continue pursuing her associate degree in Counseling at Intercoast College. According to her references, “she has overcame a multitude of obstacles in her personal life, and maintains a beyond amazing attitude, while caring for her son,” and “she is learning how to take care of herself as a single parent. Education is the key to her future. She sees that, and it is her driving force.”

The Loomis Soroptimist Community Service Award of $1000 was given to Jianna Domingo, a Del Oro student who volunteers with Stand Up Placer, a private nonprofit that provides support to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and human trafficking. Domingo explained that she renovated a play room in the Stand Up Placer safe house. “I hope that this room allows for the mother-child relationship to be nurtured,” said Domingo. The PUHSD also chose Domingo to be an inaugural student board member. She hopes to go into the field of education, work internationally and empower others to fight against injustice and overcome oppression.

Since 1978, the Senior L.I.F.E. Center of Loomis has provided social and educational activities for seniors.  SILB was instrumental in establishing the program and continues to support it through this grant that was accepted by directors, Acsa and Fred Hitchen. In addition to classes, the program offers nutritious lunches for participants.

To support education in the region, the club provides Teacher Grants to help instructors fund special projects that will have lasting impact on students.

Casey Mills and Stephanie Meyer, eighth grade teachers at H. Clark Powers received grants. Mills will spark students’ interest in reading by adding books suggested by students to his library and encouraging them to complete the 40 book challenge. Meyer anticipates using the grant for a ramp that students will use with the lunar rover they create to explain Newton’s law, graph speed and understand the forces acting on the rover.

At Placer Elementatry, kindergarten teacher Amanda Ross will purchase a microphone that she can wear around her neck and use in class for singing and talking with students as well as allow the shy chilren to use the microphone to build their confidence when speaking to groups.

Librarian, Sylvia Edmond, at Newcastle Elementary School, plans to use the grant funds to replace worn out books as well as select new appealing books that will encourage students to read.

Janine Brizendine, kindergarten teacher at Loomis Grammar School, has implemented a writer’s workshop and will purchase additional texts to excite the children about writing in addition to white boards students can use to practice handwriting. Also at Loomis Grammar School, sixth grade teacher, Susan McQueen will enable her students to practice the metric system with additional scale and calibration kits for science labs.

Karen Acosta, fifth grade teacher at Loomis Grammar School, will purchase Wobble chairs that allow active students to rock and move their feet while sitting and this continuous movement helps them focus, participate and complete assignments. Third Grade teacher at Loomis Grammar School, Julie Levens-Hupp, will either use her grant for historical costumes that children can dress up in during a biography unit or for flexible seating which research has shown helps students focus and learn.

Leslie Morgan is a middle school teacher at Penryn Elementary School and wants to purchase Lego base plates for Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math (STEAM) projects in the school’s new makerspace.

Third grade teacher, Julie Woodward, at Franklin Elementary School, intends to use the grant to address students’ diverse learning needs by enhancing her classroom environment with standing desks. Bonnie Robinson, first grade teacher at Franklin Elementary School, has found that small collaborative groupings build a positive learning environment and will purchase a rolling television stand and portable document camera to project visual aids from anywhere in the room.

At Loomis Basin Charter School, first grade teacher Christy D’Ambrosio plans new units on space and maps, and will use the grant for new books and listening center equipment.

The Loomis Basin SI club fundraises throughout the year to support the awards program. The next fundraiser is Tostado Bingo on March 30. Tickets are $30 and available at the Loomis Chamber of Commerce, from members and by calling 916-652-7252.

About Soroptimist International Loomis Basin

Soroptimist (soroptimist.org) is an international volunteer service organization for business and professional women who work to improve the lives of women and girls, in local communities and throughout the world. Soroptimist International of Loomis Basin is a 501(c)(3) organization.

To learn more about the club, join SI Loomis Basin for club meetings on the first and third Wednesday of the month at 5:30 at the Train Depot at Taylor Rd. and Horseshoe Bar Rd. in Loomis. Learn more at www.soroptimistloomis.com and find Soroptimist Loomis Basin on Facebook.

 


By John Harris, California Highway Patrol  |  2019-06-20

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - The California Highway Patrol (CHP) Valley Division today announced making arrests in a freeway shooting that occurred on March 17, 2019, on Interstate 80 in Placer County.

The shooting took place between two groups of individuals on westbound Interstate 80 at Douglas Boulevard. Multiple rounds were fired into the victim’s vehicle resulting in the driver sustaining major injuries. Immediately after the shooting, the suspect vehicle fled the scene by driving his vehicle the wrong way on the northbound Douglas Boulevard on-ramp to westbound I-80.

Through a collaborative effort with our partners in the Roseville Police Department, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Solano County Sheriff’s Department, Richmond Police Department, the Vallejo Police Department, and the Federal Bureau of Investigations Safe Streets Task Force, three arrests have been made related to this case.

Early this morning Tevarus Hill, 27, was arrested in Benicia, for attempted murder and multiple weapons charges. At the same time, Myles Sherman, 24, was arrested in Vallejo, also for attempted murder and multiple weapons charges. A third suspect, Enacio Bolton, 26, is in custody as the result of an unrelated incident and will be held for attempted murder charges.

“We want to assure the public that these acts of violence are not random but often targeted attacks between parties that know each other,” said Chief Brent Newman, commander of CHP’s Valley Division

Based on a recent increase in highway violence including freeway shootings, the CHP has taken several proactive steps to address this issue. These include redeploying staff, adding to investigative teams, involvement in zero-tolerance gang enforcement operations, and increasing communication at all levels among the involved law enforcement agencies and community leaders.

“We know how scary these types of incidents can be to a community and the CHP is doing everything in our power to locate and arrest those responsible for these senseless acts of violence,” added Chief Newman.

Anyone with information regarding a freeway shooting is asked to call the CHP Valley Division’s Investigative Services Unit at 916-731-6300.

The mission of the CHP is to provide the highest level of Safety, Service, and Security.


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SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - On June 19, 2019, at approximately 6:10 p.m., Sacramento Police Department Officer Tara O’Sullivan, 26, was shot at the scene of a domestic violence incident. She was transferred to UC Davis Medical Center where she tragically died. Officer Tara O’Sullivan was a dedicated, young officer who had only been with the department for a year. This is the first line-of-duty death of a Sacramento Police Officer in twenty years.

At 5:41 p.m., Officer Tara O’Sullivan and fellow officers responded to a domestic disturbance. Approximately thirty minutes later, shots were fired by an armed gunman inside the house. Officer O’Sullivan was struck while trying to help a woman move her items outside of the home.

With Officer O’Sullivan down, the gunman continued to fire at officers which prevented any form of rescue. An armored vehicle arrived in response and officers were able to transport her to the hospital where she succumbed to her injuries.

The standoff lasted for multiple hours until the gunman surrendered at 1:54 a.m.

Officer O’Sullivan was a recent graduate from Sacramento State’s Law Enforcement Candidate Scholars Program. After which, she graduated from the Sacramento Police Academy.

“The loss of Officer O’Sullivan is devastating, grievous, and a reminder that police work invokes heartbreak,” said Brad Houle, CAHP Credit Union President. “She displayed heroism while protecting an individual in our community. Her family, friends, and colleagues will always remember that she selflessly sacrificed her life to ensure the safety of another.”

Officer O’Sullivan will remain in the thoughts and prayers of our community as we mourn this heartbreaking loss.

The CAHP Credit Union has established a memorial fund in honor of Officer Tara O’Sullivan. The CAHP Credit Union is covering all processing fees and administrative responsibilities. Thank you for your continued support.

Donations can be made on the CAHP Credit Union website https://www.cahpcu.org/OfficerTaraOSullivanMemorialFund or mailed to:

Officer Tara O’Sullivan Memorial Fund
CAHP Credit Union
P.O. Box 276507
Sacramento, CA 95827-6507

California Association of Highway Patrolmen (CAHP) Credit Union has a membership of over 18,000 and is dedicated to matching the integrity, judgement and courtesy displayed by our peace officer members every day, in providing financial services whenever and wherever they need access to CAHP Credit Union.


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Sacramento History Museum Presents “A Page in Time Book Fair”

Traci Rockefeller Cusack, T-Rock Communications  |  2019-06-18

Cover of William Burg’s book, Wicked Sacramento. Courtesy Sacramento History Museum

SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - The Sacramento History Museum is excited to welcome at least 10 highly respected local authors and/or historians for the first-time event “A Page in Time Book Fair” on Saturday, June 29, 2019 from noon to 3 p.m. The special event will take place inside the Sacramento History Museum (101 I Street in Old Sacramento State Historic Park) and is free with paid Museum admission.

Museum guests will have the opportunity to meet the intriguing local authors and historians who can relate the fascinating history of Sacramento through a variety of viewpoints and cultural backgrounds. While additional participants may be added to the line-up, the confirmed authors/historians are as follows (two of whom have Sacramento related books being released later this month):

William Burg – local historian and author of Wicked Sacramento (release date June 24, 2019); James Christian Scott – librarian/archivist for Sacramento Public Library and contributor to Images of America: Sacramento (release date June 24, 2019) ; Annette Kassis – author of Prohibition in Sacramento: Moralizers and Bootleggers in the Wettest City in the Nation; Steve Pate-Newberry and Michelle Alberigi McKenzie – photographer and narrator for Sacramento, CA: A Photographic Portrait; Karun Yee – (representing the Chinese American Council of Sacramento) and contributor to Canton Footprints; Mary Helmich – local historian and author of A Legacy in Brick & Iron: Sacramento’s Central and Southern Pacific Railroad Shops; Ric Hornor – local historian and author of Golden Highway 1 – North, Golden Highway 2 – South, and The Golden HUB; Dr. Mark A. Ocegueda – local historian, professor and author of Mexican American Baseball in Sacramento; Dr. Bob LaPerriere – (representing the Sacramento County Historical Society), local historian and contributor to the reissued 1853 Colville’s Sacramento Directory.

Admission to the Sacramento History Museum costs $8 for adults, $5 for youth (ages 6 to 17) and is free for children ages 5 and under. Museum members who purchase a featured book can receive 20 percent off and non-members can receive 10 percent off the price of the featured book.

For more information about the “A Page in Time Book Fair” and/or the Sacramento History Museum in general, please visit www.sachistorymuseum.org.


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SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - Four developers who illegally graded roads and pads on a series of remote Trinity County properties, some of which were sold to cannabis cultivators, have agreed to pay a $325,000 fine to settle a lawsuit brought by the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board (North Coast Water Board).

The development activity, conducted without the necessary permits, made the land vulnerable to erosion and runoff issues that washed sediment into the nearby Indian Creek watershed, a tributary of the Middle Fork Trinity River, according to an investigation by the North Coast Water Board. In addition to the financial penalty, the developers and current landowners are named in a Cleanup and Abatement Order that requires correction of water quality violations.

“Illegal development for cannabis cultivation continues to be a significant issue and is a direct threat to the water quality of the north coast,” said Josh Curtis, assistant executive officer of the North Coast Water Board. “The settlement reflects that the parties acknowledged their illegal conduct, and we will be monitoring compliance with the Cleanup and Abatement Order so that these violations are corrected.”

Soil discharges into watersheds are a common concern with this kind of illegal grading, which are made worse by heavy winter rains that trigger runoff of soils that have been disturbed.

After investigating the violations, the North Coast Water Board sued the four parties in Trinity County Superior Court. The California Department of Justice filed the lawsuit on behalf of the North Coast Water Board, in coordination with the State Water Resources Control Board’s Office of Enforcement.

The settlement resolves the litigation with a stipulated judgment against the parties.

“We prioritized this case for enforcement because the unpermitted and poorly planned development of the properties caused actual and threatened discharges to Indian Creek, which is tributary to the sediment-impaired Middle Fork Trinity River,” said Curtis.

The four defendants (Clay Tucker, Barney Brenner, Rincon Land Holdings LLC, and Independence Corporate Offices, Inc.) acquired the largely undeveloped properties, then graded a series of roads and pads and sold the properties. The development was conducted without the necessary permits and in a manner that caused sediment from runoff to cloud the tributaries of Indian Creek and threaten fish habitat.

Through a combination of regulatory actions, including a Cleanup and Abatement Order for the shared access road and mandatory enrollment in the Cannabis Waste Discharge Regulatory Program for properties engaged in cannabis cultivation, the North Coast Water Board is working with the four developers and the subsequent property owners to ensure all water quality threats are addressed.

In addition to the guaranteed payment of $325,000, a suspended liability of up to $200,000 was imposed on Tucker. It will be triggered if he engages in, directs or finances conduct that violates the California Water Code within five years of the stipulated judgment.

For information regarding the North Coast Water Board, please visit https://www.waterboards.ca.gov/northcoast/


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Thousands of Distracted Drivers ‘Caught in the Act’

By Jaime Coffee, California Highway Patrol  |  2019-06-14

Citations are just one tool law enforcement has at its disposal for combating driver distraction. File Photo MPG

Results of Statewide Distracted Driving Awareness Campaign Released

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - Despite a statewide public education campaign about the dangers of distracted driving, the California Highway Patrol (CHP) issued 19,850 citations during the month of April to drivers who violated California’s hands-free cell phone laws. This total represents a 3.6 percent increase from April 2018. As part of the campaign, the CHP identified two statewide, zero-tolerance enforcement days, April 4 and 19. During that time, the CHP issued 2,459 citations to drivers for violating the handsfree law.                                                           

The CHP, the California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS), Impact Teen Drivers (ITD), local law enforcement, and other traffic safety partners worked together throughout Distracted Driving Awareness Month to educate drivers on the dangers of distracted driving. Only statistics from the CHP were available for release.

In addition to phones, other serious distractions include eating, grooming, applying makeup, reaching for fallen objects, using a vehicle’s touchscreen, knobs, dials or buttons, changing clothes, or any other task that takes your eyes or mind off the road.

“Citations are just one tool law enforcement has at its disposal for combating driver distraction,” said CHP Commissioner Warren Stanley. “Our ultimate goal is compliance with California’s handsfree law so that nothing diverts a driver’s attention or interferes with their ability to safely operate a vehicle.”

The OTS continued its “Go Safely, California” public awareness campaign for the month of April and early part of May with a focus on distracted driving. The education effort included TV and radio spots, social media posts, and outdoor billboards with messages encouraging Californians to put down the phone while driving.

“Drivers on their cell phone are a stubborn problem that will continue to require extensive education about the dangers and enforcement of laws against using cell phones behind the wheel,” OTS Director Rhonda Craft said. “It is a bad habit that may be hard for some to break, but is something that far too often leads to tragic consequences,” she added

ITD, a Sacramento-based nonprofit that educates teens on the dangers of reckless and distracted driving, kicked off Distracted Driving Awareness Month with a Teen Safe Driving Roundtable at California State University, Sacramento. ITD hosted the event with the CHP and the National Transportation Safety Board to discuss ways to improve teen driver safety where driver distraction is the primary cause of crashes.

“Seventy-five percent of teen fatal car crashes do not involve drugs or alcohol but everyday behaviors become lethal when a new inexperienced driver chooses to engage in them behind the wheel,” said ITD Executive Director Dr. Kelly Browning.

The OTS hosted an event April 12 at Sacramento’s Inderkum High School to educate students on the importance of driving free of distractions. Students even had the chance to experience first-hand how distractions impact your driving ability through simulator goggles.

The OTS is holding a statewide distracted driving video and billboard contest for high school students, with $15,000 in total cash prizes. All California high school students ages 14 to 20 are eligible to participate. The OTS is still accepting entries through May 20. For details on rules and how to enter, visit gosafelyca.org.

Distracted driving remains a top concern for California drivers. According to a 2018 public opinion survey conducted by University of California, Berkeley, nearly half of all drivers surveyed listed distracted driving because of texting or talking on a cell phone as their biggest safety concern on roads.

“Many drivers understand the risks they take looking at or using their phone, but do it anyway,” Director Craft said. “Drivers must use self-discipline and make it a habit to stay off the phone.”

California has had distracted driving laws since 2008. The CHP, the OTS, and ITD remind drivers that under the handsfree cell phone law, drivers are not allowed to hold a wireless telephone or electronic communications device while operating a vehicle. Drivers under the age of 18 are not allowed to use a cell phone for any reason, including hands-free.


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Tips to Keep Teen Drivers Safe While Driving

By Michael Blasky, AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety  |  2019-06-14

Talk with teens about the dangers of risky situations, such as speeding, impairment and distracted driving. File Photo MPG

WALNUT CREEK, CA (MPG) The 100 days between Memorial Day and Labor Day are considered the most dangerous for teen drivers. In the past five years, during that time, nearly 3,500 people across the country were killed in crashes involving teen drivers.

New data analyzed by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety reveals that the three most common behaviors that contribute to the spike in teen crashes during the summer months are speed, impaired driving, and distracted driving.

Following are some impressive facts on the issue:

More than a quarter (28%) of teen crashes involve speeding; One in six (17%) teen drivers test positive for alcohol in fatal crashes; More than half (60%) of teen crashes involve distraction.

“As an advocate for safe roads, AAA wants parents and guardians to be concerned about scary, but true, teen driving statistics,” said Michael Blasky, spokesperson for AAA Northern California. “Through education, training, and parental involvement, we can help young drivers become better and safer drivers. This in turn, can help make the roads safer for everyone.”

To keep roads safer this summer, AAA encourages parents and guardians to:

Lead by example and minimize your own risky behavior when driving; Talk with teens about the dangers of risky driving situations, such as speeding, impairment and distracted driving; Make a parent-teen driving agreement that sets family rules for teen drivers; Become familiar with resources like TeenDriving.AAA.com, which can help prepare families and teens for the summer driving season.

“Not only do teen drivers pose a risk to themselves, they’re also a risk for their passengers and others they share the road with,” Blasky said. “We want parents and guardians to take this rite of passage seriously by setting and consistently enforcing rules for teen drivers this summer.”

In addition to TeenDriving.AAA.com, the AAA StartSmart program can help parents and guardians become more effective in-car coaches as well as advice on how to manage their teen’s overall driving privileges.

About AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety
Established in 1947 by AAA, the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety is a not-for-profit, publicly funded, 501(c)(3) charitable research and educational organization. The AAA Foundation’s mission is to prevent traffic deaths and injuries by conducting research into their causes and by educating the public about strategies to prevent crashes and reduce injuries when they do occur. This research is used to develop educational materials for drivers, pedestrians, bicyclists and other road users. Visit www.AAAFoundation.org.

About AAA Northern California
AAA has a proud history of serving Members for over 100 years. AAA is on a mission to create Members for life by unleashing the innovative spirit of 4,000 employees representing 6 million Members across Northern California, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, Montana, Wyoming and Alaska. In addition to legendary roadside assistance, AAA offers home, auto and life insurance, and extraordinary travel services. According to Via Magazine's Smart Guide, being a AAA Member can save you more than $1,200 a year. Learn more at AAA.com.


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‘Blue Star Museums’ Free to Military Personnel and Families

By Traci Rockefeller Cusack, T-Rock Communications  |  2019-06-13

A U.S. Air Force F-4 McDonnell Douglas Phantom II at the Aerospace Museum of California. Photo courtesy of the Aerospace Museum of California.

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - Seven Sacramento area museums are participating in Blue Star Museums, a collaboration among the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense and more than 2,000 museums across America by offering free admission to all active duty military personnel and their families now through Labor Day (September 2), 2019.

The seven local museums participating in Blue Star Museums include the following: Aerospace Museum of California, California Automobile Museum, California Museum, Crocker Art Museum, Fairytale Town, Powerhouse Science Center and the Sacramento History Museum.

First Lady of the United States Melania Trump and Second Lady of the United States Karen Pence are honorary co-chairs of Blue Star Museums 2019. This year’s participating organizations include fine art, science, history, and children’s museums, as well as zoos, aquariums, gardens, and more.

The free admission program is available for those currently serving in the United States Military –

Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard as well as members of the Reserves, National Guard, U.S. Public Health Commissioned Corps, NOAA Commissioned Corps, and up to five family members.

Qualified members must show a Geneva Convention common access card (CAC), DD Form 1173 ID card (dependent ID), or a DD Form 1173-1 ID card for entrance into a participating Blue Star Museum.

Before planning a visit, guests are encouraged to contact the individual museums for hours of operation and note some are normally closed on Mondays and in observance of holidays such as Memorial Day and Labor Day.

For more information or a complete list of participating Blue Star museums, please visit https://www.arts.gov/national/blue-star-museums. For more information about upcoming activities offered by Sacramento area museums, “like” them on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/SacMuseums, follow them on Instagram and Twitter @SacMuseums or visit the user-friendly website at www.SacMuseums.org.

About Blue Star Families
Blue Star Families builds communities that support military families by connecting research and data to programs and solutions, including career development tools, local community events for families, and caregiver support. Since its inception in 2009, Blue Star Families has engaged tens of thousands of volunteers and serves more than 1.5 million military family members. With Blue Star Families, military families can find answers to their challenges anywhere they are. For more information, visit bluestarfam.org. Follow Blue Star Museums on Twitter @NEAarts and @BlueStarFamily, #bluestarmuseums.

About the Sacramento Area Museums (SAM)
Comprised of 30 greater Sacramento area museums working in partnership with Visit Sacramento, SAM’s mission is to raise awareness of local museums by giving the community the opportunity to discover California’s fine art, history, science and wildlife treasures. SAM achieves its mission through implementing cooperative promotions and developing strategic marketing alliances, by encouraging sharing of knowledge and resources among its partner institutions. For more information, visit
www.SacMuseums.org.

*Some museums closed on Memorial Day (Mon., May 27, 2019) and Labor Day (Mon., Sept. 2, 2019); please check participating venues for holidays and hours.


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Sierra Nevada Conservancy Governing Board Awards for Restoration Projects

By Brittany Covich, Sierra Nevada Conservancy  |  2019-06-13

AUBURN, CA (MPG) - At its quarterly meeting, the Sierra Nevada Conservancy (SNC) Governing Board approved a total of $3,122,551 in funds for five different projects focused on improving watershed and forest health throughout the Sierra Nevada.

Each of the selected projects strike at the heart of the Sierra Nevada Watershed Improvement Program (WIP), SNC’s large-scale restoration initiative designed to improve ecosystem and community resilience in the Region.

“The projects authorized for funding by our board today will provide community protection and improve forest and watershed health more broadly,” said Sierra Nevada Conservancy Executive Officer, Angela Avery. “These are great examples of the type and kind of work that the Sierra Nevada Watershed Improvement Program is focused on implementing with our partners across the region.”

Four of the approved projects are specifically forest health grants funded through Proposition 1 (The Water Quality, Supply, and Infrastructure Improvement Act of 2014) and Proposition 68 (The California Drought, Water, Parks, Climate, Coastal Protection, and Outdoor Access for All Act of 2018). The Yuba Watershed Institute was awarded $300,000 for its ‘Inimim Forest Restoration Project – Phase 1 to aid in forest restoration and watershed health in Nevada County. Sagehen Creek Field Station, a research and teaching facility of the University of California at Berkeley located in the Tahoe National Forest, was awarded $1 million for its Pushing the Larger Landscape Into Resiliency Through Fire project. An additional $721,487 was authorized to the Sierra Foothill Conservancy in Mariposa County for the Von Der Ahe Forest Enhancement Project and $506,714 went to the Plumas Audubon Society for its efforts to improve the health of the forests in the Genesee Valley, a significant tributary to the north fork of the Feather River.

Finally, $594,350 was allotted for the Blacksmith Project, an undertaking by the El Dorado National Forest to aid in landscape resilience and improve growing conditions for trees in a 6,000-acre area east of Georgetown, Ca. Funding for this project came from CAL FIRE’s California Climate Investments (CCI) grant program, which puts billions of Cap-and-Trade dollars to work throughout the state to help improve public health, the environment, and the economy by reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHGs).

Additional information about these projects and the programs that fund them can be found at www.sierranevada.ca.gov in the June 2019 Board Meeting materials.

About the Sierra Nevada Conservancy and the Sierra Nevada Watershed Improvement Program
The Sierra Nevada Conservancy (SNC) is a state agency whose mission is to improve the environmental, economic, and social well-being of the 25-million-acre Sierra Nevada Region. The SNC leads the Sierra Nevada Watershed Improvement Program (WIP), a large-scale restoration program designed to restore the health of California’s primary watershed and create resilient Sierra Nevada Communities. Additional information about the SNC and the WIP can be found atwww.sierranevada.ca.gov.

 

 


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“You’re a Grand Old Rag: George M. Cohan’s Broadway”

By Janis Wikoff, Auburn Placer Performing Arts Center  |  2019-06-13

Image of Paragon Ragtime Orchestra. Courtesy APPAC

On Stage at the State Presenting Theatrical

AUBURN, CA (MPG) - For over a century, the name George M. Cohan has conjured the rollicking magic that is Broadway. As America’s beloved tunesmith and original “Song & Dance Man,” he was the father of modern musical theater.

You’re a Grand Old Rag, played from the showman’s original 1900s Broadway orchestrations, offers a stirring look at George M. Cohan’s amazing life and music – Give My Regards to Broadway, The Yankee Doodle Boy, Over There!, and all the rest. A tap-dancing bravura performance that brings audiences to their feet!

Based on the Orchestra’s BILLBOARD-charted “Top Classical Album” of the same name, this celebration of early American musical theater stars modern-day Broadway song & dance man, Colin Pritchard.

Now enjoying its 33nd season, The Paragon Ragtime Orchestra is the world’s only year-round, professional ensemble specializing in the authentic recreation of “America’s Original Music” – the sounds of early theater, “silent” cinema, and vintage dance.

PRO has acquired a considerable following both here and abroad through its radio programs on National Public Radio, New York Times' WQXR, and the BBC. Since 1989 more than 600,000,000 people have enjoyed the Orchestra’s recorded area music on Main Street, U.S.A. at Disneyland, Disney World, and Disneyland Paris.

Date and time: Saturday, June 29, 2019~ 7:30 PM

Run Time: 2 hours with intermission

Reserved Seating: $30, $25 Groups of 6 or more

Location: State Theatre, 985 Lincoln Way, Auburn CA

Box Office: www.livefromauburn.com or 530-885-0156

 


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